cheniqua and latifah fo lifey

tits make me happy

forensicsandpathology:

The Strange Deaths of 20 Interesting People
1. King Adolf Frederick of Sweden ate himself to   death in 1771: His last meal included lobster, caviar, cabbage, smoked   herring, and Champagne, followed up by 14 servings of his favorite   dessert, semla in hot milk.
2. Allan Pinkerton, founder of the Pinkerton detective agency, died from an infection incurred after he bit his tongue.
3. Jack Daniel, purveyor of fine whiskey, died from an infection sustained after kicking his safe and busting his toe.4. Isadora Duncan,  an early 20th century modern dancer,  was killed by her trademark scarf  while riding in a convertible car.  The long scarf blew back and  wrapped around a tire axel, breaking  Duncan’s neck.5. Vic Morrow, lead actor from the television series Combat!, was decapitated by a helicopter blade during a stunt for The Twilight Zone: The Movie gone way bad. Two Vietnamese children also died in the accident,   prompting the film industry to institute stricter child labor laws.
 6. Tycho Brahe, 16th   century Danish nobleman and astronomer, supposedly died of a bladder   infection after holding it way, way too long during a banquet. Good   story, but not true: A 1996 report showed that though Brahe did become   ill after the banquet with symptoms similar to a bladder infection, he   actually died of mercury poisoning. Brahe and his assistants frequently   used mercury in alchemical experiments, however, how the mercury got   into his system in such a concentrated dose remains a mystery.
7. Tennessee Williams, longtime alcoholic and author   of some of the most enduringly bleak plays of the 20th century, choked   on an eyedropper bottle cap in 1983.
8. Sherwood Anderson, author of Winesburg, Ohio,   died of peritonitis – an infection of the lining of his stomach,   suffered after he swallowed part of a toothpick.
9. Norman “Chubby” Chaney, one of the original Little Rascals,   died as a result of a glandular disorder at the age of 21. Evidently,   what made him a popular character on the show – his weight, which at  one  point topped 300 pounds on his 4-foot 7-inch frame – was actually   contributing to his death.
10. Attila the Hun died of a nosebleed on his wedding night – he passed out drunk and drowned in his own blood,
11. Sir Francis Bacon died after trying to preserve a   chicken in snow; the famous scientist contracted pneumonia after the   successful experiment and died a few months later.
12. Aeschylus, Greek playwright, died after an eagle dropped a tortoise on his head. The tortoise reportedly lived.
13. Chrysippus, Greek stoic philosopher, is believed   to have died of laughter after getting his donkey drunk and watching  it  attempt to eat figs.
14. A bug allegedly flew into Roman emperor Titus’s nose and, for the next seven years, happily ate at his brain. According to the Babylonian Talmud, it was the size of a bird when he died.
15. Keith Relf of the Yardbirds was electrocuted by his own electric guitar.16. According to Karl Shaw’s book 5 People Who Died During Sex and 100 Other Terribly Tasteless Lists, Emperor Claudius of Rome choked on a feather he’d been using to induce vomiting during a banquet   in 54 AD. Other historians say he was poisoned by his wife, Agrippina.17. Playwright Christopher Marlowe,  who was perhaps  better known in his day than even contemporary  Shakespeare, died in 1593  after a fatal argument in a tavern over a  bill – he was stabbed in the  eye.18. King Henry I died in 1135 of food poisoning after  overdosing on lampreys, a  parasitic eel-like marine animal popular in  British cuisine during the  Middle Ages. Because he died while in France,  his remains were sewn  into the hide of a bull and shipped back to  England for burial.
19. Bobby Leach cheated death when he made the   historic (and historically stupid) trip over Niagara Falls in a barrel,   the second person to do so, but he wasn’t so lucky on dry land. The   stuntman slipped on an orange peel and fractured his leg – which then   became infected. Despite the amputation of the gangrenous limb, Leach   still died only two months later.
20. Draco, Greek lawmaker whose stringent legal code   gave rise to the word “draconian,” died somewhere in the 7th century   BCE, supposedly after particularly masterful speech: He suffocated under   the mounds of hats and cloaks thrown upon him by admiring Greeks, as a   show of appreciation.

forensicsandpathology:

The Strange Deaths of 20 Interesting People

1. King Adolf Frederick of Sweden ate himself to death in 1771: His last meal included lobster, caviar, cabbage, smoked herring, and Champagne, followed up by 14 servings of his favorite dessert, semla in hot milk.

2. Allan Pinkerton, founder of the Pinkerton detective agency, died from an infection incurred after he bit his tongue.

3. Jack Daniel, purveyor of fine whiskey, died from an infection sustained after kicking his safe and busting his toe.

4. Isadora Duncan, an early 20th century modern dancer, was killed by her trademark scarf while riding in a convertible car. The long scarf blew back and wrapped around a tire axel, breaking Duncan’s neck.

5. Vic Morrow, lead actor from the television series Combat!, was decapitated by a helicopter blade during a stunt for The Twilight Zone: The Movie gone way bad. Two Vietnamese children also died in the accident, prompting the film industry to institute stricter child labor laws.

 6. Tycho Brahe, 16th century Danish nobleman and astronomer, supposedly died of a bladder infection after holding it way, way too long during a banquet. Good story, but not true: A 1996 report showed that though Brahe did become ill after the banquet with symptoms similar to a bladder infection, he actually died of mercury poisoning. Brahe and his assistants frequently used mercury in alchemical experiments, however, how the mercury got into his system in such a concentrated dose remains a mystery.

7. Tennessee Williams, longtime alcoholic and author of some of the most enduringly bleak plays of the 20th century, choked on an eyedropper bottle cap in 1983.

8. Sherwood Anderson, author of Winesburg, Ohio, died of peritonitis – an infection of the lining of his stomach, suffered after he swallowed part of a toothpick.

9. Norman “Chubby” Chaney, one of the original Little Rascals, died as a result of a glandular disorder at the age of 21. Evidently, what made him a popular character on the show – his weight, which at one point topped 300 pounds on his 4-foot 7-inch frame – was actually contributing to his death.

10. Attila the Hun died of a nosebleed on his wedding night – he passed out drunk and drowned in his own blood,

11. Sir Francis Bacon died after trying to preserve a chicken in snow; the famous scientist contracted pneumonia after the successful experiment and died a few months later.

12. Aeschylus, Greek playwright, died after an eagle dropped a tortoise on his head. The tortoise reportedly lived.

13. Chrysippus, Greek stoic philosopher, is believed to have died of laughter after getting his donkey drunk and watching it attempt to eat figs.

14. A bug allegedly flew into Roman emperor Titus’s nose and, for the next seven years, happily ate at his brain. According to the Babylonian Talmud, it was the size of a bird when he died.

15. Keith Relf of the Yardbirds was electrocuted by his own electric guitar.

16. According to Karl Shaw’s book 5 People Who Died During Sex and 100 Other Terribly Tasteless Lists, Emperor Claudius of Rome choked on a feather he’d been using to induce vomiting during a banquet in 54 AD. Other historians say he was poisoned by his wife, Agrippina.

17. Playwright Christopher Marlowe, who was perhaps better known in his day than even contemporary Shakespeare, died in 1593 after a fatal argument in a tavern over a bill – he was stabbed in the eye.

18. King Henry I died in 1135 of food poisoning after overdosing on lampreys, a parasitic eel-like marine animal popular in British cuisine during the Middle Ages. Because he died while in France, his remains were sewn into the hide of a bull and shipped back to England for burial.

19. Bobby Leach cheated death when he made the historic (and historically stupid) trip over Niagara Falls in a barrel, the second person to do so, but he wasn’t so lucky on dry land. The stuntman slipped on an orange peel and fractured his leg – which then became infected. Despite the amputation of the gangrenous limb, Leach still died only two months later.

20. Draco, Greek lawmaker whose stringent legal code gave rise to the word “draconian,” died somewhere in the 7th century BCE, supposedly after particularly masterful speech: He suffocated under the mounds of hats and cloaks thrown upon him by admiring Greeks, as a show of appreciation.

onionchan:

free period fun

onionchan:

free period fun

lilith-wtf-is-a-tumblr:

Hahahahahhahaha

lilith-wtf-is-a-tumblr:

Hahahahahhahaha